Desert Shrubs

Share native plant sightings, info about plants that grow in the Death Valley area, or ask questions about wild desert plants here.

Re: Desert Shrubs

Postby recluse » Wed Oct 21, 2015 7:21 pm

The Salt Desert Shrub Ecosystem
It may not be a picture perfect landscape, but it's a healthy ecosystem that serves a purpose in the overall scheme of things.
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Re: Desert Shrubs

Postby CactusHugger » Sat May 14, 2016 7:42 am

King Clone
King Clone is thought to be the oldest creosote bush ring in the Mojave Desert. The ring is estimated to be 11,700 years old, making it one of the oldest living organisms on Earth. This single clonal colony plant of Larrea tridentata reaches up to 67 feet (20 m) in diameter, with an average diameter of 45 feet.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Clone
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Re: Desert Shrubs

Postby CactusHugger » Sat May 14, 2016 7:48 am

Greasewood
Common names can be confusing since greasewood is a name for:
  • Adenostoma fasciculatum (chamise or greasewood)
  • Baccharis sarothroides (broom baccharis, desertbroom, greasewood, rosin-bush and groundsel)
  • Glossopetalon spinescens (spiny greasebush, spiny greasewood and Nevada greasewood)
  • Gutierrezia sarothrae (broom snakeweed, broomweed, snakeweed, greasewood, and matchweed)
  • Larrea tridentata (creosote bush and greasewood)
  • Sarcobatus vermiculatus (greasewood, seepwood, and saltbush)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greasewood
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Re: Desert Shrubs

Postby panamint_patty » Wed May 25, 2016 7:47 am

GREASEWOOD: That's a name I've heard used over and over, but have never really had a specific plant associated with. I have to admit that I'm surprised that creosote is one of the plants sometimes called greasewood. The others on the list either make more sense for the name or are plants I'm not familiar with.
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Re: Desert Shrubs

Postby panamint_patty » Tue Feb 07, 2017 8:37 am

Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata) is the dominant or a codominant plant in most of the three major deserts of the southwest: Chihuahuan, Sonoran, and Mojave. Plants eventually form clonal rings and can live thousands of years. The oldest known ring is believed to be more or less ten thousand years old.
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Re: Desert Shrubs

Postby BoraxBill » Fri Jul 28, 2017 6:47 am

A CURE FOR CANCER? CHAPARRAL HERB (GREASEWOOD)
Normal people call it creosote, but it's not likely to have any positive health effects... of course, you never know.
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Re: Desert Shrubs

Postby twister » Tue Aug 01, 2017 7:47 am

Ultimate Plant called Brittlebush, Encelia farinosa - brittle bush
This seems like the perfect shrub for desert landscaping.
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Re: Desert Shrubs

Postby cactuspete » Mon Jan 08, 2018 9:29 am

twister: I've seen a few brittlebush plants around Trona and Ridgecrest, but not nearly as many as would be expected based on the attractiveness of the plant. It really should be utilized more, especially with water shortages looming in the near future.
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Re: Desert Shrubs

Postby shadylady » Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:27 am

cactuspete: Definitely a beautiful plant and it being a native it would take next to no water at all. I bet a couple gallons a week would get it through the summer once it's established. You could have a yard full of them and use less water than required for a single tree in the case of many species of trees!
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Re: Desert Shrubs

Postby deathvalleyjake » Sun Aug 05, 2018 7:26 am

Microphyll Woodlands
This video pertains mainly to the Sonoran Desert, but it's somewhat relevant to the Mojave Desert also.
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