Brain Health

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Re: Brain Health

Postby wildrose » Mon Jun 26, 2017 9:00 am

What's the Difference Between Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia?
There are lots of things that can go wrong with the brain as we age. Actually some of these can strike a person while they are still young.
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Re: Brain Health

Postby cactuspete » Sat Jul 01, 2017 8:15 am

Brain Evolved to Need Exercise
The basic idea:
As humans transitioned from a relatively sedentary apelike existence to a more physically demanding hunter-gatherer lifestyle, starting around 2 million years ago, we began to engage in complex foraging tasks that were simultaneously physically and mentally demanding, and that may explain how physical activity and the brain came to be so connected.

The implications:
Having this underlying understanding of the exercise-brain connection could help researchers come up with ways to enhance the benefits of exercise even further, and to develop effective interventions for age-related cognitive decline or even neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

LINK: http://neurosciencenews.com/evolution-brain-exercise-6982/
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Re: Brain Health

Postby drdesert » Sat Dec 23, 2017 8:28 am

Eating greens may boost brain health
Whether or not greens do much for your brain or not, they probably are better for you than most food alternatives providing that you don't overdo the fatty salad dressing or cheese or other toppings that might not be too good for you.
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Re: Brain Health

Postby recluse » Sat Jan 06, 2018 8:57 pm

SOME BRAIN HEALTH ADVICE
10 Ways to Love Your Brain

Growing evidence indicates that people can reduce their risk of cognitive decline by adopting key lifestyle habits. When possible, combine these habits to achieve maximum benefit for the brain and body. It’s never too late or too early to incorporate healthy habits.

Break a sweat.
Engage in regular cardiovascular exercise that elevates your heart rate and increases blood flow to the brain and body. Several studies have found an association between physical activity and reduced risk of cognitive decline.

Hit the books.
Formal education in any stage of life will help reduce your risk of cognitive decline and dementia. For example, take a class at a local college, community center or online.

Butt out.
Evidence shows that smoking increases risk of cognitive decline. Quitting smoking can reduce that risk to levels comparable to those who have not smoked.

Follow your heart.
Evidence shows that risk factors for cardiovascular disease and stroke — obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes — negatively impact your cognitive health. Take care of your heart, and your brain just might follow.

Heads up!
Brain injury can raise your risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Wear a seat belt, use a helmet when playing contact sports or riding a bike, and take steps to prevent falls.

Fuel up right.
Eat a healthy and balanced diet that is lower in fat and higher in vegetables and fruit to help reduce the risk of cognitive decline. Although research on diet and cognitive function is limited, certain diets, including Mediterranean and Mediterranean-DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), may contribute to risk reduction.

Catch some Zzz’s.
Not getting enough sleep due to conditions like insomnia or sleep apnea may result in problems with memory and thinking.

Take care of your mental health.
Some studies link a history of depression with increased risk of cognitive decline, so seek medical treatment if you have symptoms of depression, anxiety or other mental health concerns. Also, try to manage stress.

Buddy up.
Staying socially engaged may support brain health. Pursue social activities that are meaningful to you. Find ways to be part of your local community — if you love animals, consider volunteering at a local shelter. If you enjoy singing, join a local choir or help at an afterschool program. Or, just share activities with friends and family.

Stump yourself.
Challenge and activate your mind. Build a piece of furniture. Complete a jigsaw puzzle. Do something artistic. Play games, such as bridge, that make you think strategically. Challenging your mind may have short and long-term benefits for your brain.

SOURCE: https://emerge.me/blog/top-aging-experts-reveal-the-best-habit-for-how-to-stay-young/
The MIND diet score has 15 dietary components including 10 brain healthy food groups (green leafy vegetables, other vegetables, nuts, berries, beans, whole grains, fish, poultry, olive oil and wine) and 5 unhealthy food groups (red meats, butter and stick margarine, cheese, pastries and sweets, and fried/fast food).

SOURCE: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4532650/
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